Nate Claiborne, Bible teacher at International Community School in Orlando FL

"I found this book to almost completely strength. It well written and accessible to audiences who are not schooled in scientific jargon. ... This book would make a great supplement in a biology class, but it is also an enjoyable read for anyone interested in the creation vs. evolution discussion/debate." (sic)

One of his top 3 books of the year in the category Apologetics.

 

Nathaniel Claiborne, a teacher of Bible and Apologetics at International Community School wrote a two-part review of mapping on his blog. In the first part he says:

I found this book to almost completely strength. It well written and accessible to audiences who are not schooled in scientific jargon. Throughout the book, Rau puts an asterisk next to any words that will be defined in the glossary, though he also defines them in context on their first appearance. The charts are outstanding, and honestly the book itself is simply a commentary on appendix 1 "Tables Comparing the Six Models of Origins." Rau also includes a second appendix "Comparison of Various Interpretations of Genesis 1" which is also very useful.

Being very familiar with much of the literature out there myself, I found Rau's overall typology to be a very good way of understanding what the dominant views are, as well as how they can be fruitfully compared. This book would make a great supplement in a biology class, but it is also an enjoyable read for anyone interested in the creation vs. evolution discussion/debate.

In the second installment he focuses on the idea of conceptual change found in the Epilogue, with a profound (and I believe correct) implication for apologetics:

After presenting 6 models of the beginning of everything (not one by one, but through different themes), Rau offers an epilogue that almost (almost!) reveals his own position. He does though explain why conceptual change is hard. Pulling from what looks like an interesting essay in Cognitive Models of Science, Rau gives four factors that must be present for conceptual change to take place:

1. There must be dissatisfaction with current conceptions
2. A new conception must be intelligible
3. A new conception must appear initially plausible
4. A new conception should suggest the possibility of a fruitful research program
...
If you are into apologetics, this would mean your primary task is creating dissatisfaction with the status quo. Not presenting evidence for the Christian faith (which is #2, and #3 above). Unless you've made an effort to create conceptual nausea in the person's current worldview, you are wasting your time trying to prove your case.

Read the whole review (in two parts) at:
http://nathanielclaiborne.com/mapping-the-origins-debate-6-models-of-the-beginning-of-everything/
http://nathanielclaiborne.com/why-you-usually-cant-persuade-someone-theyre-wrong/

Claiborne also mentions the book in several other blogs, citing it as one of his top 3 books of the year in the category apologetics:
http://nathanielclaiborne.com/how-to-spend-that-amazon-gift-card-you-just-got-book-edition/
http://nathanielclaiborne.com/reflections-beyond-the-creation-vs-evolution-debate/
http://nathanielclaiborne.com/four-views-on-the-historical-adam/